CULT X MDW19 | THEMES AND TRENDS

As we roamed the Fairgrounds and the Milano streets during Design Week, it was impossible to ignore a few key themes that shone brightly. Here, we give you a wrap-up our top theme and trend highlights from the 2019 edition of Milan Design Week and Salone del Mobile.


RE-ISSUED CLASSICS//

We saw revivals of classic furniture from over half of our brands exhibiting at Design Week this year, with the re-issue of over 20 historic and iconic designs.

 

Montana reissued an iconic 1971 design by Verner Panton – the Pantonova seating system – originally designed for Varna, a Danish restaurant that become notorious in the 1970s, thanks to the bold colours, shapes and patterns of its interior design.

  

Carl Hansen expanded their portfolio of design classics with the re-introduction of over five designs. Amongst these was the CH30 dinging chair by Hans J. Wegner, and the Huntsman Chair and Deck Chair Series by Børge Mogensen.

DEEP AUTUMNAL TONES//

The love affair with subtle nudes and neutrals has lessened this year in favour of a bolder palette of deep, autumnal tones. Across products, fabrics and even stand designs we saw mustards, dark greens, deep burgundies, blues and mahogany tones.

 

 

 

 

 

L-R// &tradition - The Preview, Kasper Kjeldgaard X Fritz Hansen - Wallpaper Handmade, Mirror by Adam Goodrum and Arthur Seigneur – Local Milan, Poltrona Frau - Rho Fiera Fairgrounds, Orla Sofa by jasper Morrison for Cappellini, S-Chair Décor by Tom Dixon for Cappellini, Fritz Hansen Rho Fiera Stand, Fritz Hansen Planner Shelving – Rho Fiera Fairgrounds.

TECH IN DESIGN//

From re-charge stations throughout the Brera District, to interactive stands and installations, technology had a strong presence throughout Milan Design Week and Salone del Mobile and we were fascinated to see the thought-provoking ways in which the design and tech worlds collided.

 

COS presented a 3D-printed pyramid pavilion by Arthur Mamou-Mani - an interlocking modular form, part-sculpture, part-pavilion. Known for his skills in research and technology, Mamou-Mani’s London-based studio has created open-source 3D-printing software that is widely used across the industry.

Google partnered with scientists on a MDW exhibition that showed how different aesthetic experiences can impact our health and wellbeing. A Space for Being required its visitors to wear a wristband that detected their physical and physiological responses to each space.

OE Quasi is the latest innovation by Olafur Eliasson for Louis Poulsen. To ensure glare-free illumination, the LED light sources are placed where the metal vertices meet, with silicone light guards used to disperse the light along the frame’s inner edges. The light guards produce an even illumination that is directed towards the lamp’s core and reflected back into the room by the layered white laminae. The overall effect is of a glowing orb, encased in a shell that looks as if ‘it could be from outer space or the bottom of the ocean’, as Eliasson says.

For more news from MDW19, view our full Cult x MDW19 News & Trends Review here.